By Alanna Mustin, PA

At 7 a.m. Monday, eager delegates gathered in the Blue Ridge Center lobby to see if their proposals passed into Second Committee. As they scanned the pages, many faces gleamed with joy while others showed the agony of defeat.

One of those fortunate enough to be chosen for Second Committee was first-year Pennsylvania delegate Olivia Stoner. Proposal No. 174 aims to prevent backlogs of sexual assault kits, more commonly known as rape kits, by federalizing the amount of time the kits can spend in storage. She got the idea for her proposal from watching an unhealthy amount of Law and Order Special Victims Unit.

“I feel so cheetahlicious and amazing for getting chosen; there were so many other great proposals in mycommittee I didn’t think I would make it,” Stoner said.

Stoner fears that her proposal will not make it to Third Committee due to higher competition and limited space. However, even if it does not move forward, the experience has given her the confidence to speak openly about her ideas.

Experience at CONA does not always assure a delegate that their proposal is more likely to pass, as four year Minnesota delegate Peter Dudziak learned. His proposal, No. 25, attempted to resolve tension between Ireland and the United Kingdom through the Irish Republican Army losing the title of a “ForeignTerrorist Organization.”

“I mean, of course I’m disappointed, but I mean what can I do?” Dudziak explained, “I tried to make an original proposal and it was too original. No one had any background knowledge on it so it wasn’t debatable enough.”

The tension to pass proposals all the way to general assembly is rising as the days of CONA progress, making matters more interesting for all delegates.

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